Sweet Potato, Aubergine & Feta “Sausage” Rolls

No banter today, pals! Straight into the good stuff; the good stuff being, in this case, a super easy and tasty veggie sausage roll. This is a one-pan recipe, great for snacking and lunchboxes, easy to customise… It’s got it all.

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Sweet Potato, Aubergine & Feta “Sausage” Rolls (Vegetarian, Gluten-free)

Makes 16 sausage rolls
Preparation time: 10 minutes
Cooking time: 55 minutes

Equipment

Large roasting tray, lined with greaseproof paper; mixing bowl; masher; vegetable peeler; pastry brush; knife and chopping board.

Ingredients

  • 1 sheet puff pastry (can use GF)
  • 1 medium sweet potato
  • 1 large aubergine
  • 125g feta*
  • 2 tbsp plain flour (GF flour will work fine)
  • Salt & pepper
  • Milk/beaten egg for sealing and glazing
  • 1 tbsp olive oil

Optional: I sprinkled poppy seeds and sesame seeds on the top of these, but this is entirely at your discretion. I’m not the seed police.

Method

  1. Pre-heat your oven to 180C. Peel the sweet potato and chop it into small-ish chunks; the size isn’t massively important, as you’ll be mashing it once it’s roasted, but you want it to cook in the same time as the aubergine. The aubergine itself needs to remain whole, but prick it all over 5-10 times with a fork to let the steam out. Nobody wants to have to clean an exploded aubergine out of their oven. Place the chopped sweet potato and pricked aubergine onto your lined roasting tray, and drizzle everything with a little olive oil. Season with salt and pepper – you might not want to use much salt, as feta is quite a salty cheese already. Put the tray into your hot oven and roast for around 35 minutes.
  2. Once the aubergine is good and soft, take everything out of the oven. Transfer the sweet potato to your mixing bowl and give it a little mash – there should be a lot of soft, sweet potato-y goodness in there, as well as some yummy roasty crispy bits. The aubergine will be hot, but you should be able to safely transfer it to your chopping board using a spatula. Slice it in half lengthways and let it steam for a few minutes like that. You need to get the skin off, and mine was cooked well enough that it just peeled right off, but if you’re struggling with that you can scoop out the flesh inside with a spoon instead. Roughly chop the flesh and add to the bowl with the sweet potato, the flour, and around two-thirds of the crumbled feta cheese. Mix together thoroughly, adding a little more flour if it still seems a bit wet. Leave it to cool slightly for 5-10 minutes.
  3. Lay out your pastry and cut it in half lengthways to make two strips of dough. Spoon half of the filling down the middle of each one (lengthways), and crumble over the remaining feta. Now get your milk or egg wash and prepare to do some sealing.
  4. You want to have your soon-to-be sausage rolls laid out so that there is a long edge directly in front of you. Brush a little of your chosen sealant/glaze down the long edge furthest away from you, then carefully fold the edge nearest to you over the filling; keep rolling it until you essentially have one long sausage. Repeat with the other roll. Two long sausages! Congratulations. To get sixteen sausage rolls, cut them in half, then each of those halves in half again, then each of those halves in half. Easy peasy.
  5. Transfer the sausage rolls to your lined tray, then brush each of them with a little more of the glaze. Scatter over seeds, if using, and put in the oven for 15-20 minutes, or until golden brown and puffed up. Great served warm, but just as nice straight out the fridge. Trust me.
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In this house we’re kind of obsessed with aubergine. Look at them! So steamy. Not suitable for children.

And that’s it! Barely a recipe really, but hopefully you’ll forgive me for that.

H x


 

*To my friend Kevin, and anybody else who may be interested, you can of course use any other cheese you like! Ricotta would work well, though be wary of low-fat ricotta, which might be a bit watery. Goats’ cheese would be lovely, as would any sharp, salty cheese. With ricotta and more creamy cheeses, you might need to add a little salt to your filling. Happy experimenting!

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